Current Electoral College map // VOTE NO

Current Electoral College map

Electoral college map for the 2012 United States presidential election.Electoral college map for the 2012 United States presidential election

Photograph courtesy Gage/Wikimedia Commons.

The Electoral College is widely regarded as an anachronism, a nondemocratic method of selecting a president that ought to be superseded by declaring the candidate who receives the most popular votes the winner. The advocates of this position are correct in arguing that the Electoral College method is not democratic in a modern sense. The Constitution provides that “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress.” And it is the electors who elect the president, not the people. When you vote for a presidential candidate you’re actually voting for a slate of electors.

But each party selects a slate of electors trusted to vote for the party’s nominee (and that trust is rarely betrayed). Because virtually all states award all their electoral votes to the winner of the popular vote in the state, and because the Electoral College weights the less populous states more heavily along the lines of the Senate (two Senators and two Electoral College votes for every state, and then more electoral votes added for each state based on population), it is entirely possible that the winner of the electoral vote will not win the national popular vote. Yet that has happened very rarely. It happened in 2000, when Gore had more popular votes than Bush yet fewer electoral votes, but that was the first time since 1888.

There are five reasons for retaining the Electoral College despite its lack of democratic pedigree; all are practical reasons, not liberal or conservative reasons.


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Popular Q&A

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What is the current rule of the electoral college?

The Winner-takes-all rule for the Electoral college is shared by 48 states in which the candidate receiving the majority of the vote, or a plurality of the popular vote, takes all of the State's electoral votes.

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Does anyone else think that the electoral college map currently looks like the Civil War map? | Yahoo Answers

Sure did. Obama won by the way...

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